NATURAL CURVES SURFBOARDS

Surfboard Classes and Descriptions 2014

The Wide Variety of Surfboard Designs
 

    Surfboards at the debut of the 21st century are a variety of devices designed to ride waves. Surfboards are designed for a variety of surfers, approaches to surfing (styles of surfing), and waves. They're built from a variety of materials - polyeurethane blank cores with polyester and fiberglass composite skins to styrofoam blank cores with epoxy, plastic, and fiberglass composite skins; by a variety of methods - custom, hand shaped, hand glassed, "one off" surfboards to molded computer shaped "pop outs."

Whether you're motivated to carve turns, accelerate in and out of the pocket, or pull into barrels; glide in perfect trim (like a seabird on the updraft of a wind groomed swell); cruise through waves with an occassional turn or two; or drop into huge waves today's surfer / designer / shaper can build a surfboard for you.

Reality is what we perceive it to be. One surfer's reality may vary from another's. Functional surfboard design is relative to the needs of each surfer. The wide variety of surfboards at this point in time is the surfboard designer's response to the demographic smorgasbord of surf culture. Surfers educated about surfboard design (shapes and construction) are equiped with the knowledge and understanding to select the correct surfboard(s) to maximize their surfing.

The focus of this document is a description of the variety of surfboard designs currently in use and the design components that make them relevant and functional for the surfer, their surfing, and surfing conditions. These are the features that determine the design of a surfboard.

Surfboards may be grouped into several primary classes:

Shortboards | Specialty Shortboards | Big Wave Guns | Hybrids | Longboards
 
   

[ Shortboards ]

The shortboard is a high performance surfboard that has experienced constant evolution of it's design since the mid 1960's. This design is motivated by the surfer's desire to carve radical maneuvers in, around, and through the pocket of waves. Speed, acceleration, and control are all essential to performing these maneuvers and the introduction of "new" maneuvers or "variations" of existing maneuvers. At times design evolution has been incremental - slight adjustments of rocker, bottom contours, templates, rail profiles, or volume - that over time yield a shortboard remarkably more efficient than a similar previous design. Other times design evolution has been quantum if not revolutionary - introduction of three fins, multiple concaves, staged rocker - features that overnight yield break through performance.

The shortboard is a low volume surfboard that combines the fundamental variables into a surfboard that will perform to the level of skill of the surfer. It works when the rider weights and unweights the board from rail to rail driving off the rails and fins in the face of a wave. This rail to rail action taps into the waves energy and continues to build and hold speed as the rider carves turns off the rail and fins. The length of rail in the water and the time the rider holds the rail in the water will vary from turn to turn depending on the intent of the turn and the demands of the wave. Understanding and the skill to execute based on this fine line of function determines the level of performance. Basically, the shortboard must be kept in perpetual motion. If a surfer fails to keep working the board it will go to sleep on him.

The shortboard can bring great satisfaction and great frustration to the surfer. There is little margin for error in the shaper's execution of this low volume design and equally little margin for error in the surfer's performance. Minor mistakes in design and surfing are exaggerated. However, when the design components are balanced, working together, and matched to the surfer and the conditions the performance is awesome.

Shortboard Components

Core
  • US Blanks foam close tolerance blank

    • Blank options - 60R, 64EA, 66EA
    • Density - Superlight or Ultralight
    • Stringer - 5/32 " bass or 1/16 + 1/16 " bass T band
    • Blank Rocker - Shaper's preference

Generic Dimensions
  • Length: 6' 2"
  • Width nose: 11 1/4 "
  • Width wide point: 18 1/2 "
  • Width tail: 14 "
  • Thickness nose: 1 1/4 "
  • Thickness wide point: 2 1/4 "
  • Thickness tail: 1 1/2 "

Templates
  • The outline is often parallel through wide point towards the nose and tail. Maintaining parallel lines towards nose increases potential projection out of turns. Curves (hip) forward of fins (centered on the surfers stance) determines turning radius. Tail configuration further varies the turning radius, projection, and drive features of the design.
  • Squash tail - Functional combination of drive and loose, easy to find the rail, and forgiving in tight spots.
  • Swallow tail - Maximum drive, similar to squash, reduced tail area with swallow cut really holds the rail in place.
  • Round pin tail - Very loose, curve in last 25 % of outline continues all the way through tail.

Rocker
  • Shortboard bottom rocker is either "continuous curve" or "staged" rocker.
  • Continuous curve rocker is a bottom curve with no flat spots that still flows from greater curves in the nose and entry of the surfboard to lesser curves in the mid and tail sections of the board. These smooth and continuous curves allow a surfboard to turn with relative (to length, template, and bottom contours) ease, yet develop speed, and project well out of turns.
  • Staged rocker is a bottom curve that is relatively flat through the mid section of the surfboard with accelerated curves in the entry and tail sections of the board. The staged curves rocker is a radical extension of continuous rocker where the rocker in the mid section of a surfboard has been "flattened" to dial up the speed and projection of a shortboard out of it's turns. The extent that these flat and accelerated curves transition into each other is critical to the successful application of this design. Smooth transitions allow the board to maximize performance and prevent the board from pushing water - bogging and slowing down. Poor, interrupted transitions will cause the board to drag and lose speed.

Bottom Contours
  • Variations of multiple concaves are the most common bottom contours. Concaves are one of the most complicated and contradictory design components included in the modern shortboard. Consideration of other design variables of the board is essential to decisions about the arrangement, depth, and placement of concaves. Imagination and experimentation - trial and error - testing and observation yield efficient multiple concave bottoms.

    Concaves produce lift with laminar flow (channeling water under the board) and surface area (a curved line is longer than a straight line side to side across a surface) as water passes under a surfboard. They produce additional lift when water runs into the aft section of the surfboard's template (where the template turns into the tail and crosses the path of the water flowing towards the tail) and lifts the tail under the surfers back foot. (Try placing the concave side of a spoon under a faucet of flowing water !)

    Dealing effectively with lift and drag is key to designing concaves into the bottom of a surfboard. Efficient multiple concaves feed water under a surfboard to the surfer's stance then release water through the fins and tail of a surfboard behind the surfer's back foot. When a surfer weights the rail and bottom of a surfboard he compresses the water, channeling it through the concave array. The rocker, template, rail, and fin arrangement provides this compressed water with an avenue of escape - out through the tail section of the board. This phenomena excentuates the acceleration of the surfboard through it's turns.

  • Most concave bottoms will follow a pattern like this: Flat, slight roll, or slight veep in first 12 to 20 inches of entry; shallow single concave increasing in depth to maximum depth about halfway from wide point to rail fins; double concave begins at or near this spot and carries through rail fins; double concave decreases quickly through the fins; double concave transitions to veep in last 6 to 10 inches of tail.

    Looser boards - single concave carries further towards fins before double concave develops. Driver boards - single concave transitions into double concave closer to the wide point.

    The concave array must have it's maximum depth under the surfer, between the wide point and the fins, to achieve maximum results !

Deck Contours
  • Deck contours or the side to side configuration of the deck of the shortboard vary from domed to flat. Deck contours are determined by the surfer's size, skill, and technique; the thickness and width of the board; and the rail design.

    Shortboards function by transferring weight from rail to rail. To facilitate rail to rail action boards need to roll from side to side - rail to rail - with ease. As most shortboards have a multiple concave bottom a configuration that does not tip, shapers depend on deck contours to influence the rail to rail action. Deck contours dial up and fine tune volume as it flows out to the rail. Domed or crowned decks carry less volume to the rails. Flatter decks carry more volume to the rails.

  • Domed or crowned deck - Less volume towards the rail than in the center of the board will be more sensitive rail to rail.

  • Flat or flatter deck - Carries volume out to the rail from the center of the board will be more stable and require more influence from the surfer to transfer weight from rail to rail.

  • It's important that shortboards have enough rail volume not to bog when the rail is weighted into the face of a wave. This "correct" volume carries speed while on rail and allows a shortboard to accelerate out of turns.

    An average sized surfer (approximately 5' 9" x 155 lbs) of average skill riding a 6' 2" x 18 1/4" x 2 1/4" surfboard will be right at home with a moderately domed or crowned deck. A large surfer (approximately 6' 0" x 185 lbs) of average skill riding a surfboard with the same dimensions will be more comfortable with a flatter deck.

    A light footed surfer will have better results with a crowned deck. A heavy footed surfer will have better results with a flatter deck.

    When a surfer's technique uses feet and ankles with quiet hips and upper body a crowned deck is more functional. When a surfer's technique uses hips and upper body a flatter deck is more functional.

Foils
  • The foil or distribution of thickness of the shortboard is pretty straight forward. The singular function and low volume nature of the design leaves few options.

  • The primary foil, nose to tail along the length of the board, has the thickness concentrated from 12 to 15 inches in front of the wide point to the side fins. The nose and tail are very thin - the nose more so than the tail. The transition from thin nose, to the concentration of foam under the surfer, to the thin tail must be very smooth to maximize the board's performance.

    The primary foil of a typical 6' 2" shortboard, measured from nose to tail:

    • 1 1/4 " at 12 " from nose
    • 2 " at 24 " from nose
    • 2 1/4 " at widepoint
    • 2 1/8 " at 24 " from tail
    • 1 1/2 " at 12 " from tail

  • The deck foil, side to side from nose to tail, is more crowned in the nose and transitions to a flatter side to side configuration in the tail. This facilitates a little lower and thinner rail in the nose and entry and a little fuller but not thick rail under the surfer's center of gravity.

  • The rail foil, nose to tail along the rail, mimics the primary foil. The flow is a bit more consistent, particularly from the surfers center to the tail. Rail foils should not be taken lightly. A well conceived and executed primary foil is no guarantee that the rail foil will automatically function.

    The rail foil of a typical 6' 2" shortboard, measured from nose to tail:

    • 5/8 " at 12 " from nose
    • 7/8 " at 24 " from nose
    • 1 + " at widepoint
    • 1 - " at 24 " from tail
    • 7/8 " at 12 " from tail

Rails
  • The rails of a shortboard transition from thin and round with no edge from nose / entry to widepoint in a manner that allows them to penetrate the face of a wave as the surfer rolls onto and weights the rail. The soft, round, neutral rails in the entry also facilitate easy transition from rail to rail in critical tight areas of the wave. The rail profile is nearly the same but slightly fuller at the widepoint, near the surfer's front foot. Here, the rail must support the weight applied by the surfer to maintain speed while the board is on rail. From the wide point to the tail the rail profile remains nearly the same on the deck side, but begins to shorten the radius and develop an edge on the bottom side of the rail. By the trailing edge of the side fins the rail has no tuck and an extremely hard edge. Through this transition the rail provides leverage and release so the board can accelerate off the rail and out of the turn.

Fins
  • Tri fins are the standard shortboard fin arrangement. Removable fins are most common, although glass on fins have excellent properties.

    Set further to the tail a tri fin cluster will provide more apparent drive off the tail, but in the extreme the board is more difficult to roll onto rail. Set further off the tail a tri fin cluster will roll onto rail with greater ease. There is greater responsibility on the surfer to make the board work with a "forward" fin placement. Fin clusters with more toe and cant loosen up a surfboard. Less toe and cant create more drive.

    Most shapers are comfortable with a specific "formula" for fin placement on their designs. Placement is based on the surfboard's dimensions, the intent of the board's design, and the surfer's skill and technique.

  • Typical fin specifications:

    • 4 3/8 " base
    • 4 1/2 " depth
    • Side fin template is wide base, medium tip, and medium rake. Center fin template is 1/16 " narrower in base and tip, and has slightly more rake than side fins.
    • Side fins have one sided foil with a bit of two side foil at the base of the leading edge. Center fin has two sided foil. Quality fins have no flat surfaces on foiled sides. They have minimum drag and maximum lift.

  • Typical "tail oriented" fin cluster position:

    • Center fin 3 1/4 " from tail
    • Side fins 10 1/2 " from tail
    • Side fins set 1 1/16 " from rail, with 5/32 " toe, and 6 1/2 degrees cant.

  • Typical "forward" fin cluster position:

    • Center fin 3 1/2 " from tail
    • Side fins 11 1/4 " from tail
    • Side fins set 1 1/8 " from rail, with 5/32 " toe, and 6 1/2 degrees cant.

Glassing
  • Glassing Schedule:

    • 1 x 4 ounce Bottom
    • 2 x 4 ounce Deck with optional 4 ounce butterfly tail patch
    • Matte or satin acrylic finish
    • Ideal weight - 6 pounds


 


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[ Specialty Shortboards ]

Step Down / Dwarf - slightly shorter version of the contemporary shortboard. Designed to ride like a pure shortboard in all conditions. Adequate rocker from the wide point to tail is a key design component. Natural arc of the turn is very tight yet powerful. The step down has become the go to board for most shortboard lovers. Requires skilled and fit surfer for optimum results. Can deliver awesome results in all waves.

Groveler / Rumple - even shorter version of the step down shortboard. Designed to ride like a pure shortboard in marginal conditions. Lower entry rocker, with adequate rocker from the wide point to tail, and a slightly flatter fuller deck and rail profile are key design components. Natural arc of the turn is very tight yet powerful. Can deliver awesome results in small and marginal waves.

Step Up Shortboard / Wolves - slightly longer version of the contemporary shortboard. Designed to ride like a shortboard in conditions just past the envelope of the pure shortboard.

Semiguns / Ledgemasters - designed for various types of larger and thicker waves. Paddling around the line up and at the point of take off are essential to semigun design. Design features maintain the quickness and maneuverability of the semigun.

Extended Shortboards and The Model - medium to high volume shortboards with extra width and surface area designed for bigger and older surfers.

Contemporary "Fish" - designed for similar conditions as the "groveler" with a flatter rocker profile and more surface area in the template. This board can glide or trim through small / mushy waves, doesn't require as much input from the surfer, and consequently is easier to ride than a "groveler."
 


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[ Big Wave Guns / Rhinos ]

A fundamental and simple design. Big wave surfing places brutally clear cut demands on a surfer and surfboard. First and foremost is wave catching and entry followed closely by control getting to and off the bottom of the wave. The design elements of the Big Wave Gun function to meet these requirements.

Big Wave Gun / Rhino Components

Core
  • US Blanks foam

    • Blank options - 112, 104A, 109B, and 99A
    • Density - Superblue, Supergreen, or Classic
    • Stringer - 1/2 " bass or 1/4 + 1/4 " bass T band
    • Blank Rocker - Shaper's preference

Generic Dimensions
  • Length: 10' 0"
  • Width nose: 9 3/4 "
  • Width wide point: 20 1/4 "
  • Width tail: 9 1/2 "
  • Thickness nose: 1 1/2 "
  • Thickness wide point: 3 1/4 minimum "
  • Thickness tail: 1 1/2 "

Templates
  • The outline is distinguished by it's wide point and concentration of surface area 6 to 10 inches forward of center. The outline from nose to wide point is relatively straight and designed to eliminate drag paddling into and dropping down the face of huge waves where entry is often challenged by strong winds or rips. The outline from wide point to tail is a very long, minimum curved line. There is a minimum of surface area in the back half of the board. This minimum surface area anchors the board into the face of the powerful waves for which this board is designed. The outline is designed with surface area forward to naturally place the surfer over the long rail line resulting in great projection out of turns. The features of the big wave gun's outline are about control and projection.

  • Pin tail - Most functional.

  • Swallow tail - Slightly straighter line from fin(s) to end of tail.

Rocker
  • Big wave gun bottom rocker is "continuous curve" rocker, a bottom curve with no flat spots that still flows from greater curves in the nose and entry of the surfboard to lesser curves in the mid and tail sections of the board. These smooth and continuous curves allows the big wave gun to glide through the water without "pushing" water in critical conditions, control speed, and project well out of turns.

Bottom Contours
  • Functional and simple !!! Big wave guns require a convex bottom configuration. These boards are designed to be functional and effecient in extreme conditions. Vee in the entry transitions to nearly flat or tri plane in the mid section to panel vee in the tail section of the surfboard. The vee in entry can cut through the chop and turbulence of wind blown or riptide surfaces or slice into a glassy surface at the speeds developed dropping into a big wave. The flatter mid section keeps the hull at speed and accelerates the board into the shallow panel vee in the tail. The panel vee in the tail steers the board from rail to rail and holds the board in a line much like the keel of a sailboat transfers the force of the wind into forward motion.

Deck Contours
  • Deck contours or the side to side configuration of the deck of the big wave gun are simple and functional. They transition from the high volume thickness in the center and widepoint of the board to the steep / crowned / angular rail profile. They carry the thickness as far to the rail as functionally possible for paddling and stability, then crown into the steep / crowned / angular rails with equally functional reduction in volume so the rails can bite into face of a wave to control the board in high speed drops, turns, and transitions.

Foils
  • The foil or distribution of thickness of the big wave gun has a singular function..

  • The primary foil, nose to tail along the length of the board, has the thickness developing from 12 to 18 inches behind the nose, gaining thickness through the wide point, then tapering with a strong smooth reduction of volume through the tail. Most of the volume is concentrated at the wide point corresponding to the concentration of surface area in the outline. The forward mass has a pendulum effect pulling the board down the face in take off and down the line out of the turns.

    The primary foil of a typical 10' 0" big wave gun, measured from nose to tail:

    • 1 1/2 " at 12 " from nose
    • 2 3/4 " at 24 " from nose
    • 3 1/4 " at widepoint
    • 2 1/2 " at 24 " from tail
    • 1 1/2 " at 12 " from tail

  • The deck foil, side to side from nose to tail, is crowned throughout. This facilitates a lot of volume in the center of the board with easy reduction of volume in the steep / crowned / angular rails.

  • The rail foil, nose to tail along the rail, mimics the primary foil. The flow is thin enough leading into the wide point that the surfer has no difficulty getting the rail into the water, yet full enough at the wide point to sustain planing speed on rail. The rail foil tapers from wide point to tail with the same strong smooth reduction of volume as found in the primary foil. As with all surfboards, the rail foil should not be taken lightly. A well conceived and executed primary foil is no guarantee that the rail foil will automatically function.

    The rail foil of a typical 10' 0" big wave gun, measured from nose to tail:

    • 7/8 " at 12 " from nose
    • 1 1/4 " at 24 " from nose
    • 1 1/2 + " at widepoint
    • 1 1/8 " at 24 " from tail
    • 7/8 " at 12 " from tail

Rails
  • The rails of a big wave gun are round, neutral, and forgiving in the entry. They transition from this neutral entry rail into a steep, crowned, angular profile in the wide point that tucks softly into the bottom of the board. The rail profile remains the same from the wide point through the tail, but the volume and thickness of the rail reduces with the flow of the primary and rail foil. The rail must support the forces of the surfer and the wave to control and maintain speed while the board is on rail. From the wide point to the tail the bottom of the rail profile transitions from the soft tucked profile to a hard edge with no radius. At or near the fin(s) the rail has no tuck and an extremely hard edge.

Fin(s)
  • Single fins and tri fins are both employed in big wave guns. Both single fin and tri fins benefit from a glassed on arrangement. The fin fering adds to the fin(s) foil and holding power and reduces cavitation.

  • Typical single fin specifications:

    • 6 " base
    • 9 " depth
    • Fin set 6 to 8 " from tail depending on the surface area of the tail.
    • Single fin has two sided foil for minimum drag.

  • Typical tri fin specifications:

    • Side fins 4 3/8 " base
    • Side fins 4 5/8 " depth
    • Side fins one side foil / leading edge two sided foil.
    • Center fin 4 1/2 " base
    • Center fin 4 3/4 to 5 " depth
    • Center fin two sided foil

  • Tri fin cluster position:

    • Center fin 5 " from tail
    • Side fins 15 " from tail
    • Side fins set 1 1/8 " from rail, with 5/32 " toe, and 5 1/2 degrees cant.

Glassing
  • Glassing Schedule:

    • 2 x 6 ounce Bottom / Resin rich lamination
    • 2 x 6 ounce Deck / Resin rich lamination
    • Matte or satin acrylic finish
    • Ideal weight - 10 to 12 pounds


 


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[ Hybrids ]

Is this where the evolution of surfboard design is leading the largest slices of surf culture's demographic pie ? Why shouldn't surfers of all skills have a well designed surfboard - a surfboard that will maximize their surfing experience. Hybrid design varies with the surfer, the approach they take to surfing, and the waves they intend to ride. Borrowing components from modern shortboards and integrating them into a longer surfboard with significant surface area, hybrids combine the thrill of carve and glide.

Hybrid Components

Core
  • US Blanks foam close tolerance blank

    • Blank options - 74R, 711R, and 84R
    • Density - Superblue or Supergreen
    • Stringer - 3/16 " bass or 1/8 + 1/8 " bass T band
    • Blank Rocker - Shaper's preference

Generic Dimensions
  • Length: 7' 4"
  • Width nose: 13 1/2 "
  • Width wide point: 20 1/2 "
  • Width tail: 14 1/4 "
  • Thickness nose: 1 3/8 "
  • Thickness wide point: 2 3/4 "
  • Thickness tail: 1 5/8 "

Templates
  • The outline is a clean continuous curve. The wide point is well in front of center to carry surface area out towards the nose. Surfers are comfortable in trim and turning the board in long arcs from this forward area. The outline in the tail is borrowed from the shortboard. The turning radius off the tail varies with the intent of the surfer and the demands of the wave from tighter to longer arcs. Tail configuration further varies the turning radius, projection, and drive features of the design.
  • Squash tail - Functional combination of drive and loose, easy to find the rail, and forgiving in tight spots.
  • Round pin tail - Very loose and forgiving - transitions and rotates from rail to rail with ease.

Rocker
  • Hybrids bottom rocker is "continuous curve rocker." This is a bottom curve with no flat spots that still flows from greater curves in the nose and entry of the surfboard to lesser curves in the mid and tail sections of the board. These smooth and continuous curves allow a surfboard to turn with relative ease, yet develop speed, and project well out of turns.

Bottom Contours
  • Hybrids have very simple bottoms. They flow from slight vee or roll entry to shallow tri plane wide point to panel vee with soft transition on the center of the vee. (A sharp vee can be tracky and unforgiving.)

Deck Contours
  • Deck contours or the side to side configuration of the deck of hybrids is a soft crown, thicker in the middle and thinner towards the rails. These moderate to high volume boards are much easier to control when the volume is reduced towards the rails.

Foils
  • The foil or distribution of thickness of the hybrid is balanced from nose to tail.

  • The primary foil, nose to tail along the length of the board, has the thickness concentrated from 12 to 15 inches behind the nose through the wide point to 15 to 18 inches from the tail. The nose and tail are thinner - the nose more so than the tail. The transition from thinner nose, to the concentration of foam from the wide point to the fin area, to the thinner tail must be very smooth to maximize the board's performance.

    The primary foil of a typical 7' 4" hybrid, measured from nose to tail:

    • 1 3/8 " at 12 " from nose
    • 2 1/4 " at 24 " from nose
    • 2 3/4 " at widepoint
    • 2 3/8 " at 24 " from tail
    • 1 5/8 " at 12 " from tail

  • The deck foil, side to side from nose to tail, is moderately crowned throughout.

  • The rail foil, nose to tail along the rail, mimics the primary foil. The flow is a bit more consistent, particularly from the wide point to the tail. Rail foils should not be taken lightly. A well conceived and executed primary foil is no guarantee that the rail foil will automatically function.

    The rail foil of a typical 7' 4" hybrid, measured from nose to tail:

    • 5/8 " at 12 " from nose
    • 1 " at 24 " from nose
    • 1 1/4 " at widepoint
    • 1 1/8 " at 24 " from tail
    • 7/8 " at 12 " from tail

Rails
  • The rails of a hybrid are borrowed from the modern shortboard. They transition from thin and round with no edge from nose / entry to widepoint in a manner that allows them to penetrate the face of a wave as the surfer rolls onto the rail. The soft, round, neutral rails in the entry also facilitate easy transition from rail to rail in critical tight areas of a wave. The rail profile is nearly the same but slightly fuller at the widepoint. From the wide point to the tail the rail profile remains nearly the same on the deck side, but begins to shorten the radius and develop an edge on the bottom side of the rail. By the trailing edge of the side fins the rail has no tuck and an extremely hard edge. Through this transition the rail provides leverage and release so the board can accelerate off the rail and out of the turn. The profile of a hybrid rail is usually a bit lower or more crowned on the top of the rail than the profile of a shortboard rail.

Fins
  • Hybrids may have one of two fin arrangements: a tri fin cluster or a single fin with rail bites.

    A hybrid with a tri fin cluster will drive off the rail and tail much like a shortboard, and hold a high line in trim. A hybrid with a single fin / rail bite arrangement will have a "ball bering" flow from rail to rail, and hold a neutral line in a critical section of a wave. The single fin / rail bite arrangement is a more "forgiving" board.

  • Typical tri fin specifications:

    • 4 7/16 " base
    • 4 9/16 " depth
    • Side fin template is wide base, medium tip, and medium rake.
    • Side fins have one sided foil with a bit of two side foil at the base of the leading edge. Center fin has two sided foil. Quality fins have no flat surfaces on foiled sides. They have minimum drag and maximum lift.

  • Typical tri fin cluster position:

    • Center fin 3 1/2 " from tail
    • Side fins 11 3/4 " from tail
    • Side fins set 1 1/16 " from rail, with 5/32 " toe, and 5 1/2 degrees cant.

  • Typical single fin / rail bite specifications:

    • Center fin 7 1/2" cutaway
    • Rail bite 3 3/4 " base
    • Rail bite 3 5/8 " depth
    • Center single fin has two sided foil cutaway at trailing edge base.
    • Side fins have one sided foil with a bit of two side foil at the base of the leading edge.

  • Typical single fin / rail bite fin cluster position:

    • Center fin 6 1/2 " from tail
    • Side fins 13 " from tail
    • Side fins set 1 1/16 " from rail, with 5/32 " toe, and 5 1/2 degrees cant.

Glassing
  • Glassing Schedule:

    • 1 x 6 ounce Bottom
    • 1 x 6 ounce and 1 x 4 ounce Deck
    • Matte or satin acrylic finish
    • Ideal weight - 8 pounds


 


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[ Longboards ]

Glide like a seabird on the updraft of a wind groomed swell.
 


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